Insulation

Insulation 101

There are several common types of insulation — fiberglass (in both batt and blown forms), cellulose, and spray foam.


Insulation performance is measured by R-value — its ability to resist heat flow. Higher R-values mean more insulating power. Different R-values are recommended for walls, attics, basements and crawlspaces, depending on your area of the country. Insulation works best when air is not moving through or around it. So it is very important to seal air leaks before installing insulation to ensure that you get the best performance from the insulation.


Own your own home? What insulation, and how much, would work best in your home? First, check the insulation in your attic, ceilings, exterior and basement walls, floors, and crawl spaces to see if it meets the levels recommended for your area. Insulation is measured in R-values—the higher the R-value, the better your walls and roof will resist the transfer of heat. DOE recommends ranges of R-values based on local heating and cooling costs and climate conditions in different areas of the nation. Here is what the U.S. Department of Energy recommends for the total R-Value for new wood-framed houses:

- Attic: R30 to R60
- Wall Cavity: R13 to R15
- Floor: R19

When correctly installed with air sealing, each type of insulation can deliver comfort and lower energy bills during the hottest and coldest times of the year.

Although insulation can be made from a variety of materials, it usually comes in four types; each type has different characteristics.

Batts—are flexible products made from mineral fibers, such as fiberglass and rock wool.
They are available in widths suited to standard spacing of wall studs and attic or floor joists: 2x4 walls can hold R-13 or R-15 batts; 2x6 walls can have R-19 or R-21 products.

Loose-fill insulation—usually made of fiberglass, rock wool, or cellulose in the form of loose fibers or fiber pellets, it should be blown into spaces using special pneumatic equipment. The blown-in material conforms readily to building cavities and attics. Therefore, loose-fill insulation is well suited for places where it is difficult to install other types of insulation.

Spray foam insulation —foam insulation is typically more expensive than fiber insulation; however, it's very effective in buildings with space limitations and where higher R-values are needed. Foam insulation R-values range from R-4 to R-6.5 per inch of thickness, which is up to 2 times greater than most other insulating materials of the same thickness. Foam also gives you a moisture barrier, air barrier and R-Value where fiberglass only gives you R-Value.

Call 803.951.2378 or contact us at Lucas Insulation and let us discuss your options.

Great work, great price I highly recommend!

Kirk C., Columbia, SC